SunFounder PCF8563 IIC I2C Real Time Clock RTC and DS18B20 Temperature Sensor Module

SunFounder PCF8563 IIC I2C Real Time Clock RTC and DS18B20 Temperature Sensor Module

US$8.99
SKU: TS0914

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SunFounder PCF8563 IIC I2C Real Time Clock RTC and DS18B20 Temperature Sensor Module

Features
1. Integrates RTC PCF8563 and DS18B20 temperature sensor.
2. Provides battery backup for continuous timekeeping; Low power consumption.
3. Complete clock calendar functions include second, minute, hour, day, date, month and year timekeeping, which provides valid time until the year 2100 with leap year compensation.
4. Supports PCF8563 I2C output and DS18B20 digital output, so you just plug the ports into Raspberry Pi to use.
5. Working voltage: 3.3V; Dimensions: approx. 14*13*15mm/0.55*0.51*0.59’’.

Product Description

Details

Technical Details
Introduction
This mini-size Nano module integrates the PCF8563 RTC and DS18B20 temperature sensor. It works well with Raspberry Pi and Arduino, and you can just plug the 5-pin female header into the Raspberry Pi to use the module. Besides, it has low power consumption, and provides battery backup for continuous timekeeping.
For more information, refer to: http://wiki.sunfounder.cc/index.php?title=RTC-Nano

Package Included
1 x RTC Nano Module

Additional Information

Additional Information

Name SunFounder PCF8563 IIC I2C Real Time Clock RTC and DS18B20 Temperature Sensor Module
Free Shipping No
UPC 717760744197
  • Review
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Scripts not quite right, but great product. By Edward 2018-05-17 10:12:59

"Product works great. Instructions are a little lacking, but easy to work through. I didn't need to remove anything from the Blacklist as the instructions indicated. The rest of the instructions worked though. At first, the time was not current, but running a ""sudo hwclock --systohc"" fixes that. To make this work on boot, you have to edit the ""/etc/rc.local"" file manually, instructions didn't work here. Add the following before the ""exit 0"" lines:
echo ds1307 0x68 | sudo tee /sys/class/i2c-adapter/i2c-1/new_device
hwclock -s

Once this is done, it keeps time, and maintains it after reboot. Awesome."

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starsAwesome breakout board! By Dan 2018-05-17 09:41:12

"It works great once properly configured. Apparently systemd has corrupted some hwclock functionality when you are using debian.. do some googling on how to configure and it's pretty simple. You have to enable the drivers in /boot/config.txt, and enable I2c. From there you have to disable ntp (unfortunately) because it will corrupt the clock during boot as of now. Then configure either systemd or rc.local to read the time on boot.

As for the clock itself it is very small, great for the small form factor of the PI. no wires or moving around to worry about. They have lots of detailed hardware information on there website that is very interesting. They packing was good as well, clock is inside of a small box and inside of a sealed anti static bag. I'm very pleased with it.
It is also supposed to be very accurate.. something like +/- 1 minute a month. compared to +/- 2 minutes a day on the previous version, not bad."

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Product works great. By drm 2018-05-08 09:09:50

Product works great. Instructions are a little lacking, but easy to work through. I didn't need to remove anything from the Blacklist as the instructions indicated. The rest of the instructions worked though. At first, the time was not current, but running a "sudo hwclock --systohc" fixes that. To make this work on boot, you have to edit the "/etc/rc.local" file manually, instructions didn't work here. Add the following before the "exit 0" lines:
echo ds1307 0x68 | sudo tee /sys/class/i2c-adapter/i2c-1/new_device
hwclock -s

Once this is done, it keeps time, and maintains it after reboot. Awesome.

  • Quality
  • Value
  • Price
Worked on Pi 3 with these instructions By steven 2018-05-07 10:25:15

Worked just fine for the Pi 3. I needed the real-time clock due to a project I'm working on. Didn't even realize the Pi 3 doesn't come with a hardware clock. Last time I dealt with that was in the early 90s... but anyway, this isn't plug and play, you do need to manually do some configuration editing to make the hardware clock active. You can google around and get the same info to install but I'm posting here mostly for myself so I can easily reference this in the future. Beware that a lot of what you find online are obsolete for the Pi 3! So be careful. This was taken off the thewaylabs courtesy of Dr. Marcus Durham and slightly adapted by me. Where it has a >> means you enter those commands into the shell verbatim.

1. Ensure you already installed the RTC module. If you haven't, turn OFF the Pi first, then install the module. Best explanation here is to just look at the photo to see how the module is oriented.

2. Raspian Wheezy and Jessie support a realtime clock. The instructions are for Jessie. (NOTE: This is 5/2016, no doubt if you're reading this years from now these instructions might not work)
Assure the files are up to date.

>>> sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade

3. Check /boot/overlays to assure that i2c rtc device tree overlay exists /boot/overlays/i2c-rtc-overlay.dtb (JUST CHECK TO SEE IF FILE EXISTS)

4. To enable the rtc, edit /boot/config.txt.

>>>sudo nano /boot/config.txt

5. Add the following line to the config.txt and SAVE (Ctrl X then Y)

dtoverlay=i2c-rtc,ds3231

6. Restart the Pi to have the hardware rtc recognized

7. Edit the file /lib/udev/hwclock-set to remove fake clock.

>>sudo nano /lib/udev/hwclock-set

8. Comment out these three lines (Type # at beginning of line to comment out).
if [ -e /run/systemd/system ] ; then
exit 0
fi

9. Comment out the two lines which contain the word
--systz (Type # at beginning of line to comment out; comment out the WHOLE line)

10. Control of the clock uses the hwclock command.
To set the clock for its first use, copy the system time into the clock module:

>>sudo hwclock -w

11. To read the time from the clock module:

>>sudo hwclock -r

12. To copy the time from the clock module to the system:

>>sudo hwclock -s

13. Now the RTC maintains the time, rather than getting time from the internet. YOU'RE DONE.

You can test it out by disabling your wireless radio on your router temporarily, reboot your Pi 3 and then check the date. Since the network will appear down, the clock setting is retained in memory. Yay !

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